SCIENTIFIC STEERING COMMITTEE

ARGENTINA
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales 

AUSTRALIA
South Australian Museum

AUSTRIA
Natural History Museum Vienna

BELARUS
Scientific & Practical Center of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus for Bioresources

CANADA
Centre for Biodiversity Genomics

CHINA
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

COLOMBIA
Alexander von Humboldt Institute

COSTA RICA
Comisión Nacional para la Gestión de la Biodiversidad

EGYPT
Suez Canal University

FINLAND
University of Oulu

FRANCE
Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle

GERMANY
Bavarian State Collection of Zoology

INDIA
Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University

LEBANON
Universite Saint-Joseph

MEXICO
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur

NETHERLANDS
Naturalis Biodiversity Center

NEW ZEALAND
Cawthron Institute

NORWAY
Norwegian Barcode of Life Network

PAKISTAN
Balochistan University of Information Technology, Engineering & Management Sciences

PERU
Peruvian Barcode of Life Network

PHILIPPINES
University of Philippines Diliman

POLAND
University of Lodz

PORTUGAL
University of Minho

SLOVAKIA
Slovak National Museum – Nature History Museum 

SOUTH AFRICA
University of Johannesburg

THAILAND
Chulalongkorn University

TURKEY
University of Ankara  

UNITED KINGDOM
Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh 

UNITED STATES
National Museum of Natural History

Director, Kunming Institute of Botany
China

Pablo Tubaro

Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales 
Argentina

Pablo L. Tubaro is a Principal Researcher at the National Research Council of Argentina (CONICET), Curator of Birds and Director of the National Museum of Natural Sciences of that country (MACN). Since 2004 he has been involved in DNA barcoding and served as a member of the International Scientific Cooperation Committee of the iBOL project and Chair of the Steering Committee of the All Birds Barcoding Initiative. He has taught behavioral ecology, systematics and evolution of vertebrates at the University of Buenos Aires for more than 25 years. His main research interest deals with the evolutionary biology of birds including: 1) systematics and phylogeography of Neotropical birds, 2) hybridization and speciation, and 3) comparative studies about the evolution of morphological and behavioral traits.

Mark Stevens

South Australian Museum
Australia

Mark completed his B.Sc. (Honours) on native bees at Flinders University in 1997. He received a doctoral scholarship from the University of Waikato in New Zealand where he completed his Ph.D. on amphipods and Antarctic springtails in 2003. He then moved to Massey University (The Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution) as a postdoctoral researcher working with Prof David Penny which allowed Mark to continue his Antarctic research. In 2004, he was awarded a four-year postdoctoral fellowship from the New Zealand Foundation for Research Science and Technology. In 2008 Mark joined the Museum as Research Scientist in the Terrestrial Invertebrates Section. Mark currently also holds an Associate Professor (Affiliate) position at the University of South Australia.

Mark’s research interests include invertebrates, and in particular work on Collembola, nematodes, tardigrades, and rotifers, but also Hymenoptera. An important aspect to his current work is an integrated molecular, systematic and palaeoecologicalic/phylogeographic diversification to be traced from origins to the present and contrasted against climate/biome shifts (e.g. aridification).

Nikolaus Szucsich

Natural History Museum Vienna
Austria

Nikolaus Szucsich is the coordinator of the Austrian Barcode of Life initiative. His research topics span many aspects of organismic zoology, from (i) Integrative Systematics and DNA barcoding of arthropods, to (ii) phylogenetics and phylogenomics, to (iii) Evolutionary and Functional Morphology of arthropods, and (iv) theoretical aspects of Evolutionary Biology. His main groups of interest are myriapods and primarily wingless insects, with a special love for neglected groups like jumping bristletails, proturans, pauropods, and symphylans. He has worked at the Universities of Vienna Rostock, Hamburg and Salzburg, and currently is associated with the Natural History Museum of Vienna.

Tatsiana Lipinskaya

Scientific & Practical Center of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus for Bioresources
Belarus

Tatsiana Lipinskaya is a lead research scientist of the Laboratory of Hydrobiology at the Scientific and Practical Center of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus for Bioresources  in Minsk, Belarus. She received her M.S. degrees in Biological Sciences (Graduate School of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus; 2009) and in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation (Ghent University, Belgium; 2014) and her PhD in Hydrobiology (Scientific and Practical Center for Bioresources; 2015). Her primary focus of research is ecological and taxonomic studies on freshwater zoobenthos. Tatsiana completed the Global Taxonomy Initiative Training Course on Rapid Identification of Invasive Alien Species for Achieving Aichi Biodiversity Target 9 at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario in 2015 (University of Guelph, Canada). In 2018, she received a grant from the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Japan Biodiversity Fund to organize the Global Taxonomy Initiative training course hosted in Minsk, Belarus. She is Belarussian representative in the European Cost Action DNAqua-Net since March 2018. Tatsiana’s main DNA barcoding interests concern freshwater ecosystems, with a particular focus on aquatic alien invertebrates and EPT group.

Paul Hebert

Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph
Canada

Paul Hebert has 30 years of experience in the oversight of major research and academic units including Director of the Great Lakes Institute at the University of Windsor, Chair of the Department of Zoology at the University of Guelph, Board Chair at the Huntsman Marine Science Centre, and Founding Director of the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario. He currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Molecular Biodiversity at Guelph where he is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and Director of the Centre for Biodiversity Genomics. Over his career, he has trained more than 100 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, and has received more than $100 million in research grants. Since 2000, his research has focused on the development and application of DNA-based identification systems.  Since 2010, he has been Scientific Director of the International Barcode of Life project, the largest research program ever undertaken in biodiversity science. His nearly 500 publications have attracted 64,000 citations, generating an h-index of 104. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and received the 2018 Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences. He holds honorary degrees from the Universities of Waterloo, Western, and Windsor.

Chenxi Liu

Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
China

Dr. Chenxi Liu is an Associate Professor at the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), Beijing, China. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Entomology from China Agricultural University (CAU). In 2007, Dr. Liu earned his Ph.D. degree in Agricultural Entomology from CAU, and then worked as a post-doctoral researcher until 2011 in the Institute of Plant Protection of CAAS, with specialization in the insect resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin. He joined the Sino-American Biological Control Laboratory, IPP-CAAS and started to serve as an associate professor in 2012. Dr. Liu’s current research interests include the development of biological control agents for insect pest management, nutrigenomics of beneficial insects, and biodiversity of insect pest and their natural enemies.

DE-ZHU LI

Director, Kunming Institute of Botany
China

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Mailyn González

Alexander von Humboldt Institute
Colombia

Mailyn Gonzalez leads the Conservation Genetics Laboratory at the Institute Alexander von Humboldt, in Colombia. She has been coordinating activities of the iBOL Colombia network since 2010, in particular, organizing national symposia and training. She has been participating in projects seeking to enrich the DNA barcode libraries for plants, vertebrates, fungi, and insects and is currently conducting metabarcoding projects of soils in strategic ecosystems. Her background is in plant community ecology and she has interest in phylogenetic diversity and the use of genetic information for biodiversity management.

José Alfredo Hernández Ugalde

Comisión Nacional para la Gestión de la Biodiversidad
Costa Rica

José Alfredo Hernández is a Genetic Access Regulator Officer in Costa Rica’s National Commission for Biodiversity Development (CONAGEBIO). He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Genetic and Molecular Biology from the Universidad de Costa Rica. His post-graduation research was on the phylogenetic relationships of pejibaye palm (Peach Palm, Bactris gasipaes) with its wild relatives. Then for three years, he worked in biotechnology of Plant Tissue Culture in vitro, mainly with orchids and other ornamentals. Since 2006, he has been part of CONAGEBIO as a Genetic Access Regulator, an advisor in conservation topics, and as a member of the Biosecurity Technical Commission. Simultaneously, he is the head of the delegation for Costa Rica-GBIF (Global Biodiversity Information Facility). His primary interest is facilitating access to information about Costa Rican biodiversity, for its use in education, conservation, public policies, the private sector, and research.

Samy Zalat

Suez Canal University
Egypt

Dr. Samy Zalat is a Professor of Taxonomy and Ecology at the Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt and the Chairman of Nature and Science Foundation, Cairo, Egypt. He is the first biologist to work in South Sinai after Egypt regained it from Israel in 1982 and he has worked there ever since. He completed his M.Sc. surveying bees and wasps visiting wild plants in 1984. He received a doctoral scholarship funded by the Egyptian government, and, in 1989, completing his Ph.D. at Nottingham University on the taxonomy and biochemistry of the potter wasps (subfamily: Eumeninae) of Egypt. He continued his research in the Sinai Peninsula and, in 2002, he was awarded the Egyptian National Prize in Biology. He has participated in work that has supported the declaration of St. Katherine as a National Park in Egypt and has led the project to map the biodiversity of Egypt from 2004-2008 (BioMAP-Egypt).

Zalat’s research interests include studying the biodiversity of Sinai Peninsula and examining the effect of isolation and speciation in different taxa of the wadi (valley) systems in the high mountains of St. Katherine. Along with his collaborators, he is studying different taxa in Sinai including wild flora, bees, wasps, butterflies, small mammal (Acomys dimidiatus) and their parasites. Recently, his interests have focused on the human dimension to conservation and he has established an NGO named Nature and Science Foundation to work with local people and to publicize biodiversity to different audiences in Egypt and worldwide.

RODOLPHE ROUGERIE

Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle
France

Rodolphe Rougerie is a researcher and curator of Lepidoptera collections at the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris. Since 2016, he is the scientific coordinator of the Service for Molecular Systematics, a molecular biology platform within the Museum. His research activities are directed toward documenting and understanding the outstanding diversity of terrestrial invertebrates on Earth. Although not exclusively, his main focus is on Lepidoptera, with a special interest on the systematics and evolutionary history of two emblematic families: Saturniidae (Wild Silkmoths) and Sphingidae (Hawkmoths). While a Post Doctoral Fellow at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Rodolphe led global DNA barcoding campaigns for Saturniidae and Sphingidae whose DNA barcode libraries are now nearly comprehensive (ca. 5000 species and subspecies) This work served as the cornerstone for the development of two nationally-funded projects investigating the macroecology and the evolutionary dynamics of these moths. Through multiple national and international collaborations, his DNA barcoding activities also extend to other taxa (e.g. Coleoptera, Oligochaeta) addressing ecological questions in temperate and tropical regions.

MARKO MUTANEN

University of Oulu
Finland

Marko Mutanen is the Senior Curator and molecular systematist at the University of Oulu, Finland. He has been a coordinator of the Finnish DNA barcoding initiative since its start in 2011. He is the Principal Investigator of the Insect Genomics Systematics group and presently leads the research project “Advancing the genomic revolution of species delimitation”, funded by the Academy of Finland. His research relies on the strong conviction that the taxonomic impediment, that is our current inability to manage the huge biodiversity of Earth by traditional means, should and could be resolved by genomic means, and he proposes to shift taxonomy from morphology-driven practices to genomic approaches. He is particularly interested in developing better ways to delimit species under various evolutionary settings. His primary model research group is Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), but he is increasingly focusing on sawflies (Symphyta) too.

Axel Hausmann

Bavarian State Collection of Zoology
Germany

Axel Hausmann is Leader of the Entomology Department at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, Munich, and curator of the Lepidoptera collection. He is scientifically overseeing the DNA barcoding projects at the Museum aiming in assembling comprehensive DNA libraries and developing metabarcoding applications. His research focus is on the integrative taxonomy of geometrid moths and he leads the international research initiative ‘Forum Herbulot’. In the last 13 years, he has provided major contributions to the DNA campaigns on Geometridae worldwide (with some 23,000 species and 170,000 sequences) and on the fauna of Bavaria and Germany (with some 24,000 species and 190,000 sequences).

Gulab Khedkar

Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University
India

Gulab Khedkar is Director of the Paul Hebert Centre for DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Studies which oversees DNA barcoding involvements in India. He is a Professor of Molecular Biology in the Department of Zoology and Director of its Centre for Coastal and Marine Biodiversity. India is home to at least 0.6 million species (about 7% of global diversity), but only 17% are known. To speed their discovery, Dr. Khedkar has promoted DNA barcoding through workshops, training courses, and collaborations. His laboratory works in the general area of evolutionary biology with a focus on aquatic organisms that combines lab and fieldwork. From a methodological perspective, he exploits diverse techniques for the molecular characterization of population (e.g. microsatellites, DNA sequencing, genome sequencing) and modelling. He is exploring genome size variation among species, and its impact on life history traits. Aside from metabarcoding studies on microbes from different ecosystems, he is probing mitochondrial evolution by assembling complete genomes for 500 taxa. He is also developing molecular protocols to aid food authentication.

Magda Bou Dagher Kharrat

Universite Saint-Joseph
Lebanon

Magda Bou Dagher Kharrat is a Professor of Plant Genetics and the Director of the Department of Life and Earth Science at the Saint-Joseph University (USJ) of Beirut, Lebanon. She is also the co-founder and vice-president of “Jouzour Loubnan”, an NGO aiming to restore and rehabilitate the most degraded landscapes in Lebanon. Her research employs genomic tools to examine biodiversity in Eastern Mediterranean countries, and to investigate plant and animal species phylogeny, phylogeography, and their historical evolutionary processes. Magda’s DNA barcoding interest lies in endemic plants and native animals. Her recent interest concentrates on eDNA metabarcoding deciphering the role of animal wildlife in ecological restoration processes. The results of her research have allowed her to develop conservation policies and forest ecosystem restoration strategies that are optimizing the survival of tree populations in the face of climate change.

Manuel Elías-Gutiérrez

El Colegio de la Frontera Sur
Mexico

A biologist from the Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala (National Autonomous University of Mexico, UNAM), graduate studies in the Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas from the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico (Doctor in Sciences). Speciality in Lake Zooplankton in Ghent University, Belgium. During 18 years was an academician in the Faculty Iztacala (UNAM) where reached the level of Professor in Zoology. Here he was awarded the Academic Merit distinction in 1996. Later he received the best research article and best academic career in the state (Council of Science, Quintana Roo, 2011). Currently, he is a senior researcher at El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Chetumal unit, where his primary focus of research is ecological and taxonomic studies on freshwater zooplankton using integrative taxonomy, in particular from the waterbodies from the Yucatan Peninsula.

Edwin van Huis

Naturalis Biodiversity Center
Netherlands

Edwin van Huis is the General Director of Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands. Naturalis is the Dutch national center for biodiversity research and the national museum for natural history. Naturalis is involved in biodiversity research in many parts of the globe, and invests largely in biodiversity informatics and information systems, working with GBIF and hosting the Catalogue of Life, as well as leading the new European ESFRI-infrastructure DiSSCo.

Susie Wood

Cawthron Institute 
New Zealand

Susie Wood is a Senior Scientist at the Cawthron Institute in Nelson, New Zealand.  She obtained her PhD from Victoria University (Wellington, NZ) in 2006 specialising in cyanobacterial blooms and toxins. Susie leds and contributes to multiple research programmes, supervises students, and regularly undertakes consulting projects for government departments and regional authorities on a range of topics related to cyanobacteria, water quality, molecular ecology and biomonitoring. She has been particularity active in advocating for the incorporation of molecular tools in biomonitoring and biodiversity projects, including the development of novel molecular based indices. She co-leds a nationwide programme that aims to obtain an overview of the health for 10% of New Zealand’s lakes (www.lakes380.com) using paleo-environmental reconstructions – the analysis includes many molecular techniques.

Torbjørn Ekrem

Norwegian Barcode of Life Network
Norway

Torbjørn Ekrem is professor of biosystematics and the Curator of Diptera, Hymenoptera, Arachnida and a few minor insect orders at the NTNU University Museum. His research interest includes evolution, systematics and biogeography, in particular of non-biting midges of the family Chironomidae (Diptera). His research focuses on taxonomy, biology, phylogeny, zoogeography and molecular systematics of genera and species of the tribe Tanytarsini, but he is also involved in work with other groups of animals and plants. The last few years he has been heavily involved in various projects testing and using DNA barcoding in biosystematics and freshwater biomonitoring. He is actively engaged in the EU COST-Action DNAqua-Net, and chair the Norwegian Barcode of Life network and project (NorBOL) with the goal of developing this initiative into a national infrastructure on DNA Barcoding.

Nazeer Ahmed

Balochistan University of Information Technology, Engineering & Management Sciences
Pakistan

Professor Nazeer Ahmed serves as the Dean for Graduate Studies at Balochistan University of IT, Engineering and Management Sciences in Quetta, Pakistan. He attained his doctoral degree from Wuerzburg University, Germany. His Ph.D. research explored the early signaling events involved in plant-microbe interactions, particularly plant interactions with mutualistic bacteria. These mutualistic bacteria are well known for their positive effects on plants growth through different mechanisms involving in particular phytohormones production and nitrogen fixation. Currently, the main focus of his work is in developing DNA-based biodiversity inventories of the different ecosystem in Balochistan, the largest province of Pakistan. He has also been involved in Global Malaise Project.

Rina Ramirez

Peruvian Barcode of Life Network
Peru

Rina Ramirez is a Professor at Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in the Faculty of Biological Sciences, and a member of its Museum of Natural History. She teaches courses in ‘Animal diversity’, ‘Bioinformatics’ and ‘Molecular Systematics’. Her main research interests are in molecular systematics and phylogeography of continental mollusks. She was part of the Peruvian Committee for the CATRTA Project “DNA barcoding to support the conservation of biodiversity, its sustainable use, and trade”.

Ian Fontanilla

University of Philippines Diliman
Philippines

Ian Kendrich Fontanilla is the Director and Associate Professor of the Institute of Biology (IB), College of Science, University of the Philippines (UP), Diliman. He is also the Principal Investigator of the DNA Barcoding Laboratory at IB and the Program Director for Biodiversity of the Philippine Genome Center, University of the Philippines. He obtained his B.Sc. Biology and M.Sc. Biology (Genetics) at UP Diliman and Ph.D. in Genetics at the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom. Ian’s main research interest is molecular phylogenetics, with an emphasis on the evolutionary history of Philippine endemic species. His team at IB is involved in various collaborative work with the Biodiversity Management Bureau of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to populate the Philippine reference database for DNA barcodes of Philippine native and endemic species that could be used in wildlife forensics.

Michal Grabowski

University of Lodz
Poland

Michal Grabowski is evolutionary biologist and zoologist at the Faculty of Biology & Environmental Protection at the University of Lodz, Poland. He is interested in biodiversity patterns and evolutionary processes as well as in the problem of biological invasions in European inland waters and coastal ecosystems. He focuses on historical factors shaping the present, particularly cryptic, diversity of various model organisms, predominantly malacostracan crustaceans. For about a decade he has led several research projects dealing with drivers of aquatic diversity in endemism hotspots, such as the Mediterranean Region, Carpathian Arch, and European ancient lakes. Michal is also an expert in integrative taxonomy of freshwater amphipods. As a consequence his main DNA barcoding interests concern freshwater ecosystems and use of the novel methods in biomonitoring. He is a management committee member actively engaged in functioning of the EU COST-Action DNAqua-Net. In co-operation with various international collaborators, he is building up a DNA-barcode reference library for European malacostracan crustaceans.

Filipe Costa

University of Minho 
Portugal

Filipe Costa is Assistant Professor at the University of Minho, Portugal, since 2008, where he leads the research group on Molecular Ecology and Biodiversity of the Centre for Molecular and Environmental Biology (CBMA). Filipe joined the Barcode of Life initiative in September 2003, serves as Portugal delegate in iBOL, and chaired the 2nd Conference of the European Consortium for the Barcode of Life (ECBOL2: 2-4 June 2010). He has been principal investigator of several research grants, leading the campaign for DNA barcoding Portuguese Marine Life, and he is one of the Portuguese representatives in the management committee of the European Cost Action DNAqua-Net. Filipe’s main DNA barcoding interests concern marine life, with a particular focus on fish and crustaceans, among other major groups of marine invertebrates (e.g. Annelida and Mollusca). Recent research interests and activities concentrate on (e)DNA metabarcoding, with particular focus on estuarine and marine ecosystems, macro and meiobenthos, and zooplanktonic communitties.

Ivona Kautmanova

Slovak National Museum – Nature History Museum 
Slovakia

Ivona Kautmanova is the Curator of the mycological collections and the head of the Botanical Department at the Slovak National Museum-Natural History Museum. Her research interest includes taxonomy and systematics as well as ecology and conservation of macromycetes. Her research focuses on the taxonomy of Basidiomycetes of the family Clavariaceae and Ascomycetes of the family Clavicipitaceae. Since 2015, she has been involved in building a DNA laboratory at the Museum, with the aim of participating in iBOL. Recently, she is the main representative of the Slovak Barcode of Life (SK-BOL) and is actively working on building the SK-BOL network.

Michelle van der Bank

University of Johannesburg
South Africa

Michelle van der Bank received her PhD in Botany from the Rand Afrikaans University (now University of Johannesburg, South Africa) in 1996. She is a Professor in Botany at the University of Johannesburg and Director of the African Centre for DNA Barcoding (ACDB). ACDB’s mission is to fill the knowledge gap and strengthen research frameworks for international, regional and inter-institutional co-operation in Africa in the field of DNA technology for biodiversity science. Her research group uses molecular phylogenetics, comparative analyses and intensive fieldwork to address questions relevant to biodiversity conservation in Africa.

Buntika Butcher

Chulalongkorn University
Thailand

Buntika Butcher is an Associate Professor at the Department of Biology in the Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand). She received her Ph.D. from Imperial College London under the supervision of Professor Donald Quicke in 2004 on the systematics of parasitic wasps in the subfamily Rogadinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Now, she is the head of the Integrative Ecology Laboratory.

Her research focuses on parasitoid wasps, especially in the family Braconidae. Using DNA barcoding, she is establishing a database of the parasitoids and the parasitoid-host relationships in Thailand with an emphasis on lepidopteran larval hosts. This work has implications for both biodiversity conservation and biocontrol applications as well as in the understanding of evolutionary biology.

Emre Keskin

University of Ankara  
Turkey

Emre Keskin is molecular evolutionary biologist and Associate Professor at the Ankara University, Turkey, where he leads the Evolutionary Genetics Laboratory (eGL). Emre is focused on molecular phylogenetics and (e)DNA (meta)barcoding techniques used to identify biodiversity in aquatic ecosystems across Europe within EU DNAqua-Net Action Network as a management committee member and a working group co-leader. He uses these techniques to study interactions among species in aquatic ecosystems, particularly invasive, endemic and endangered species and their interactions with the environment. Apart from this, his research group, Evolutionary Genetics Laboratory (eGL) is working to analyze epigenetic and metagenomic methods to investigate the evolution of microorganisms, vertebrates, and invertebrates. His working group recently started working on experimental evolution. Emre’s main focus on DNA barcoding concern freshwater and marine fish.

Peter Hollingsworth

Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh  
United Kingdom

Professor Pete Hollingsworth is Director of Science and Deputy Keeper at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. He is also an Honorary Professor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a Visiting Professor of the University of Edinburgh, and a Visiting Professor of the University of Johannesburg. His research focuses on understanding and conserving plant biodiversity. He has had a long involvement with the International Barcode of Life Project with a particular focus on the development and application of plant barcode protocols. He has a strong interest in linking scientific research to practical conservation outcomes, and has recently been involved in projects ranging from best-practice guidance for conservation translocations, understanding pest and pathogen threats to plant biodiversity, monitoring illegal trade in protected species, and undertaking large-scale spatial analyses to enhance conservation planning.

Scott Miller

National Museum of Natural History
United States of America

Scott Miller is Deputy Under Secretary at the Smithsonian Institution overseeing Science, Collections, and Interdisciplinary Support, and previously held leadership positions at the National Zoological Park, the National Museum of Natural History, the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi, Kenya, and the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii. He helped establish and lead the Consortium for the Barcode of Life—an international network that worked closely with the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding in developing DNA-based identification tools to make biodiversity information more widely available and in promoting DNA Barcoding applications in many fields including agricultural pests, ecological monitoring, and wildlife forensics. He also maintains an active collaborative research program that uses DNA barcoding as a backbone to link museum collections and taxonomic information to specimens from ecological field surveys, focusing on the ecology and systematics of herbivorous insects (especially moths), their host plants, and their parasites, primarily in Papua New Guinea and Kenya, with the ultimate goal of understanding how patterns of diversity have been generated and are maintained.

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